Tag: literature

Symbolism – Lord of the Flies

Piggy’s Glasses

Piggy is intelligent. His glasses represent the power of science and intellectual endeavour in society. This symbolic significance is clear from the start of the novel. When Jack’s hunters raid Ralph’s camp and steal the glasses, we see that these characters have given up on the ideas of science and intellect.

The Beast

The beast stands for the primal instinct of savagery. The boys are afraid of the beast. As the boys grow more savage, their belief in the imaginary beast also grows. The boys leave it sacrifices and treat it as a totemic god. The boys’ behaviour is what brings the beast into existence.

The Island

Golding’s tropical island is essentially a symbolic Garden of Eden. While the uninhabited island represents paradise, the boys’ arrival soon changes this.

The Adults

Adults symbolise civilisation. However, the World War raging outside the island makes it clear that the adult “civilisation” is as savage as the boys’ “civilisation“.

Can you think of any other symbols from The Lord of the Flies? Let us know in the comments below!

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An Inspector Calls Quiz – Literature

Here’s a handy quiz to test your knowledge of An Inspector Calls!

Question 1. The inspector is investigating the death of a girl who has drunk which liquid?

a) bleach

b) disinfectant

c) poison

Question 2. What condition is Daisy in when she asks Sybil Birling for help?

a) ill

b) starving

c) pregnant

Question 3. When is An Inspector Calls set?

a) 1908

b) 1912

c) 1914

Question 5. What did Sheila do wrong?

a) Fired Eva

b) Got Eva fired

c) Laughed at Eva

Question 11. When Eva appealed to the Brumley Women’s Charity Organisation for help, what name did she use?

a) Daisy Renton

b) Eva Smith

c) Mrs Birling

Look in the comments below to see the correct answers!

How did you do? Let us know!

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Macbeth Quiz

ONE. Who kills Macbeth?

a) Banquo

b) Lady Macbeth

c) Macduff

d) Malcolm

TWO. Whom does Lady Macbeth frame for the murder of Duncan?

a) The chamberlains

b) Macbeth

c) Malcolm

d) The porter

When you have your answers, take a look at the comments below to see how you did.

Let us know how many you got right!

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Macbeth – Key Quotes – English Literature GCSE

Here are some key quotes from Shakespeare’s Macbeth

Is this a dagger which I see before me,
The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee:
I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.

(Macbeth, Act 2 Scene 1)

Double, double toil and trouble:
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.

(Witches, Act 4 Scene 1)

Macbeth shall never vanquished be until
Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane Hill
Shall come against him.

(Third apparition, Act 4 Scene 1)

What are your favourite quotes from Shakespeare’s Macbeth?

Tell us in the comments below!

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Storm on the Island by Seamus Heaney: Literary Techniques. Power & Conflict Poetry Anthology – GCSE English Literature

Imagery

‘spits like a tame cat turned savage’ – the sea is described as an unpleasant and uncontrollable animal.

‘space as a salvo’ and ‘we are bombarded by the empty air’ – the situation is described as warlike, making it seem as though there is an attack going on by an unseen army.

Personification

‘the wizened earth’ – the earth is described as intelligent.

‘can raise a tragic chorus’ – this is when the leaves and branches are hit.

‘that it pummels’ – pummels means to hit something quickly, often used when describing a fight.

‘the sea is company’ – the sea is described as a cure for loneliness.

Metaphor

‘strafes invisibly’ – the storm is described as a fighter plane.

Diction

‘stacks’ – haystacks, formed piles of hay

‘stooks’ – groups of sheaves stood up to dry in a field

‘salvo’ – the firing of several guns or weapons

Can you find any other techniques in Storm on the Island?

Let us know in the comments below!

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A Christmas Carol – Key Quotes – GCSE English Literature

This is an important quote if you’re talking about Ebeneezer Scrooge. We get the idea that he’s not used to talking to people in this positive way. Although Scrooge is talking to another character, this quote illustrates the theme of isolation, as it reminds us that he used to be solitary and is only now trying to be sociable and positive.

“Spirit!” he cried, tight clutching at its robe, “hear me! I am not the man I was. I will not be the man I must have been but for this intercourse. Why show me this, if I am past all hope!”

This is the moment where Scrooge finally changes. It takes place in stave 4.

This is another good quote if you’re talking about Scrooge. He has woken from his experience and, although no traces of the ghosts remain, Scrooge remembers everything and that is enough for him to believe. This quote is from stave 5.

This quote is from stave 2. It relates to the theme of choice.

“I don’t know what day of the month it is!” said Scrooge. “I don’t know how long I’ve been among the Spirits. I don’t know anything. I’m quite a baby. Never mind. I don’t care. I’d rather be a baby. Hallo! Whoop! Hallo here!”

He was checked in his transports by the churches ringing out the lustiest peals he had ever heard. Clash, clang, hammer; ding, dong, bell. Bell, dong, ding; hammer, clang, clash! Oh, glorious, glorious!

This is an important quote, as the image of a bell appears frequently throughout the story.

Here’s another good quote for Scrooge. He’s talking to Fred and being as stubborn as ever. Fred just sees Scrooge as a member of his family, and he wants to have some form of relationship with him, even if he’s not a pleasant man to spend time with. This quote is from stave 1 and it’s great if you’re discussing the theme of family.

What are your favourite quotes from A Christmas Carol?

Tell us in the comments below!

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The Winslow Boy – Character Quotes – Catherine – iGCSE English Literature

Here are some useful quotes from Terence Rattigan’s The Winslow Boy. This post focuses on Catherine Winslow.

This quote is from Act 1. Catherine says this in response to Grace, who asks: “You’re such a funny girl. You never show your feelings much, do you? You don’t behave as if you were in love.

It’s a useful quote to learn, as it tells us a lot about Catherine and Grace. It also relates to the themes of family and the media.

CATHERINE: Not a verbal protest. Something far more spectacular and dramatic. He’d had his feet on the Treasury table and his hat over his eyes during most of the First Lord’s speech – and he suddenly got up very deliberately, glared at the First Lord, threw a whole bundle of notes on the floor, and stalked out of the House. It made a magnificent effect. If I hadn’t known I could have sworn he was genuinely indignant –

ARTHUR: Of course he was genuinely indignant. So would any man of feeling be –

CATHERINE: Sir Robert, Father dear, is not a man of feeling. I don’t think any emotion at all can stir that fishy heart –

This quote is also helpful if you’re discussing Arthur Winslow or Sir Robert Morton. Plus, it relates to the themes of principles, women and the media.

This quote obviously relates to Dickie as well. It’s also a good one for the theme of family.

DICKIE: Suppress your opinions. Men don’t like ‘em in their lady friends, even if they agree with ‘em. And if they don’t – it’s fatal. Pretend to be half-witted, then he’ll adore you.

CATHERINE: I know. I do, sometimes, and then I forget. Still, you needn’t worry. If there’s ever a clash between what I believe and what I feel, there’s not much doubt about which will win.

Again, this quote is also useful if you’re talking about Dickie.

This quote is also useful if you’re discussing John Watherstone. Plus, it relates to the themes of family and women.

CATHERINE: You don’t think the work I’m doing at the W.S.A. is useful?

ARTHUR is silent.

CATHERINE: You may be right. But it’s the only work I’m fitted for, all the same. (Pause.) No, Father. The choice is quite simple. Either I marry Desmond and settle down into quite a comfortable and not really useless existence – or I go on for the rest of my life earning two pounds a week in the service of a hopeless cause.

This quote also applies to the themes of principles and women.

Here, Catherine is talking to Sir Robert Morton about the possibility of her working in the courts one day.

What are your thoughts on the character of Catherine?

Tell us in the comments below!

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