Month: May 2019

Ode on Melancholy: John Keats – iGCSE Poetry, Literary Techniques

Diction

Keats repeats the word ‘sorrow’ to emphasise the theme. The reader is forced to dwell on the theme of melancholy.

Imagery & Personification

Keats personifies ‘Beauty’ and a variety of emotions and traits. The use of capital letters in the words ‘Beauty’, ‘Joy’, ‘Pleasure’, ‘Delight’, and ‘Melancholy’ is used to create this type of imagery. It is through this personification that the poet develops the idea that beauty never lasts (‘beauty that must die’).

Simile

The simile ‘like a weeping cloud’ is used to show how suddenly the emotion of sadness may set in.

Can you find any other techniques in this poem? Let us know in the comments below!

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5 Quick Miss Havisham Quotes – Great Expectations

High society is likened to heights and to the sky throughout Great Expectations. Pip’s climb up the social ladder is a little more horizontal.

“You made your own snares. I never made them.”Miss Havisham (to Pip) – Chapter 44

The above quote is great if you’re talking about the theme of deceit.

“Would it be weakness to return my love?”Miss Havisham (to Estella)

Can you find any other great Miss Havisham quotes? Let us know in the comments below!

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A Raisin in the Sun: Quotes – Act 1, Scene 1

Still, we can see that at some time, a time probably no longer remembered by the family (except perhaps for MAMA), the furnishings of this room were actually selected with care and love and even hope – and brought to this apartment and arranged with taste and pride. (stage directions)

The above quote shows that the family’s history of pride is represented through their furniture.

MAMA:
Crazy ‘bout his children! God knows there was plenty wrong with Walter Younger – hard-headed, mean, kind of wild with women – plenty wrong with him. But he sure loved his children. Always wanted them to have something – be something. That’s where Brother gets all these notions, I reckon.

The above quote deals with the theme of family.

WALTER (to Ruth):
Anybody who talks to me has got to be a good-for-nothing loudmouth, ain’t he? And what you know about who is just a good-for-nothing loudmouth? Charlie Atkins was just a “good-for-nothing loudmouth” too, wasn’t he! When he wanted me to go in the dry-cleaning business with him. And now – he’s grossing a hundred thousand a year. A hundred thousand dollars a year! You still call him a loudmouth!

WALTER:
…Baby, don’t nothing happen for you in this world ‘less you pay somebody off!

The above quote shows us that Walter believes he needs to spend money in order to gain money. He means to spend money on a bribe to help get his liquor license. This is a good quote when talking about the theme of poverty.

WALTER (to Beneatha):
Have we figured out yet just exactly how much medical school is going to cost?

This is another good quote for the theme of poverty.

RUTH:
(Wearily) Honey, you never say nothing new. I listen to you every day, every night and every morning, and you never say nothing new. (Shrugging) So you would rather be Mr. Arnold than be his chauffeur. So – I would rather be living in Buckingham Palace.

The above quotes shows us that Ruth is weary from hearing her husband have the same complaints and the same ideas to fix their problems. The family’s issues have put a strain on their relationship. This is a good quote if you’re talking about the theme of suffering.

BENEATHA:
Get over it? What are you talking about, Ruth? Listen, I’m going to be a doctor. I’m not worried about who I’m going to marry yet – if I ever get married.

The above quote is Beneatha talking to Ruth. It’s a useful one if you’re discussing the theme of gender.

Can you think of any other important quotes from this scene? Let us know in the comments below!

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Symbolism – Lord of the Flies

Piggy’s Glasses

Piggy is intelligent. His glasses represent the power of science and intellectual endeavour in society. This symbolic significance is clear from the start of the novel. When Jack’s hunters raid Ralph’s camp and steal the glasses, we see that these characters have given up on the ideas of science and intellect.

The Beast

The beast stands for the primal instinct of savagery. The boys are afraid of the beast. As the boys grow more savage, their belief in the imaginary beast also grows. The boys leave it sacrifices and treat it as a totemic god. The boys’ behaviour is what brings the beast into existence.

The Island

Golding’s tropical island is essentially a symbolic Garden of Eden. While the uninhabited island represents paradise, the boys’ arrival soon changes this.

The Adults

Adults symbolise civilisation. However, the World War raging outside the island makes it clear that the adult “civilisation” is as savage as the boys’ “civilisation“.

Can you think of any other symbols from The Lord of the Flies? Let us know in the comments below!

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GCSE Foundation Maths Diagnostic Quiz

Question Three. Which coins give you a total of 82p?

a) 5p, 1p, 1p, 1p

b) 50p, 20p, 10p, 2p

c) 20p, 20p, 20p, 1p

d) 50p, 20p, 1p, 1p

Let’s have a break and check your answers so far. Scroll past the image of the beach (maybe imagine you’re there!) to see the first few answers.

Answers so far:

Q1: d. Did you get this one? Great! No? You need to practise Place Value. I recommend this page. You can check your answers here.

Q2: b. How about that one? Yes? Fantastic! No? Don’t worry – you just need to work on your Powers and Square Roots. Try this page.

Q3: b. How did you do on that one? All good? Wonderful! Not so great? Go and practise your Money Problems. I recommend this video.

Ready to move on? Let’s go!

It must be time for another break. Scroll past the image of the stars (maybe look out of a real window for a few minutes too) to see the answers for questions 4 to 10.

Let’s see how you did.

Q4: c. If you didn’t get this one, you need to work on your Addition and Subtraction. I recommend this page. You can check your answers here. If you did get the right answer – great!

Q5: d. Didn’t get that one? No worries – try watching this video to improve your knowledge of Tally and Other Charts. You did get it right? Fantastic!

Q6: c. Did you get that one? Brilliant! No? You need to work on your Metric and Imperial Measures. Try this page.

Q7: d. How did you do on that one? If you need to practise Averages and Range, try this video.

Q8: c. Well done if you got this right. If you didn’t, you just need to work on your Powers, Roots and BIDMAS a bit more. Here’s another video.

Q9: d. Did you get that one? Great! Not this time? Just practise Exchange Rates for a bit. Try this page.

Q10: b. How about that one? If you need to work on your Algebraic Substitution, take a look at this video.

Once you’ve checked your answers and gone through any necessary revision, move on to the final five questions below.

Question Eleven. What is 15% of 2km?

a) 30m

b) 150m

c) 300m

d) 1500

Question Thirteen. Round 13.374 to 1 dp

a) 13.0

b) 13.3

c) 13.4

d) 14.0

Right, you’re all done! Let’s check the answers to the last five questions. Wander through the daisies to reach them…

Here are the final answers!

Q11: c. If you got that one, great! If not, you need to work on your Percentages. Try this page.

Q12: a. How did that one go? If you need to practise Using Place Value, try this video.

Q13: c. If you need to work on your Estimation, try this page. If you got it right – brilliant!

Q14: c. Well done if you got this one. If you didn’t – don’t worry! Take a look at this video to learn more about Compound Measures.

Q15: d. How about this last one? Did you get it right? If you need to practise Probability, try this video.

That’s it! All done! Well done if you managed to try all the questions. Hopefully you now have an idea of the areas you need to work on, along with some resources to get you started. If you got all the questions right (well done!), I suggest you try practising the questions from the second half of some practice papers.

How do you think you did? Let us know in the comments below!

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An Inspector Calls Quiz – Literature

Here’s a handy quiz to test your knowledge of An Inspector Calls!

Question 1. The inspector is investigating the death of a girl who has drunk which liquid?

a) bleach

b) disinfectant

c) poison

Question 2. What condition is Daisy in when she asks Sybil Birling for help?

a) ill

b) starving

c) pregnant

Question 3. When is An Inspector Calls set?

a) 1908

b) 1912

c) 1914

Question 5. What did Sheila do wrong?

a) Fired Eva

b) Got Eva fired

c) Laughed at Eva

Question 11. When Eva appealed to the Brumley Women’s Charity Organisation for help, what name did she use?

a) Daisy Renton

b) Eva Smith

c) Mrs Birling

Look in the comments below to see the correct answers!

How did you do? Let us know!

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